Why I cannot recommend Google Hangouts the way I recommended Talk

I was really curious about Google Hangouts. Their previous solution Google Talk worked a lot like I wanted it to, like the fact that it was based on an open standard (XMPP) or had XMPP federation enabled (so you could use it with people that didn’t use Googles servers.) But there were also things wrong or maybe not up to date. Definitely wrong was the fragmentation: There was Talk (standalone app, mobile client, integrated into Google Mail and Google+), but there was also another mobile app that came with the Google+ mobile app and was completely independent from Talk and last but not least there were online Hangouts. And in comparison to that gruesome WhatsApp (that AFAIK still doesn’t have a desktop client or an official way to run it on WiFi tablets!) it was lacking stuff some people missed, like the easy way to find your friends (with their number you already had) or adding images and group chats. But I always recommended Talk and never joined WhatsApp, since they have a really bad security history and I despise their take on client availability.

Generally I like some of the new features added in Hangouts, for example that they included the option to being found with your phone number. Google has mine already as a fallback in case something is wrong with my account, so I don’t mind, especially if I’m being asked and have the option to decline. (Google is getting a lot of my data because they ask nicely, but that’s something for another blog post.) And there are enough people that have my phone number but might not have my Google account info. There is also the matter of including images and other not text stuff. I didn’t expected it, but I enjoy the possibility to quickly send over a pic. And even though XMPP supported group chat as well, Google never implemented it in Talk. But they added the possibility in Hangouts, which is also a nice and useful thing in my book. So they improved in some areas that really needed it to stay relevant.

But sadly they made at least as many things worse:  A small thing, hopefully to be fixed soon, is the missing online indicator on the mobile. Another problem I experienced over the last few days is that there is sometimes a delay: I had chat message notifications in my browser that I opened up immediately just to find a chat message that was send 20 minutes ago. I get that mobile notifications can be a bit flaky sometimes, but my desktop should notify me at once when I get a new message in my instant messenger. I also have the feeling that the mobile app uses lots of resources, but I didn’t measure it. It is just a feeling that since I upgraded, I have to wait for my home screen on my android to load far to often. As far as the more integrated messenger experience is concerned they failed so far: This YouTube video  shows how inconsistent it works with video chats.

All those things might be fixed in the future, there is nothing fundamentally wrong. But I think the worst decision they made is switching away from an open protocol to their own closed one. Google had been very good in the past with public APIs and open protocols so that external developers could connect to their services. But it feels like they are turning their back on all of that, especially in their newer products. Google+ still has no way of using external clients (I for one would like a „one client for all my social networks“ solution and only Google is stopping that) and now the messaging solution is turned from open and federated to completely closed. (So far, but given that Google+ is without external apps for about two years now, I wouldn’t hold my breath as I tried after the Google+ launch.) This past openness always made me recommend Talk. I knew if I used Talk, I could also communicate with my old contacts from Jabber (XMPP) and in theory with the help of transports even other networks like ICQ or MSN. Every chat solution I used with the exception of XMPP and therefore Google Talk forced you to make your friends use the same network as yourself to be able to communicate with them. Or switch over to theirs. If somebody told me before Hangouts they don’t like Google and don’t want an account, I could tell them to use any server listed here (or even run their own) and we could still communicate. I know it would have been hard to implement the new features in compliance with XMPP, but it doesn’t change the fact that I’m afraid that Google loses their openness. With the Google Reader fiasco Google lost a lot of trust and I’m growing more suspicious ever since.

Sure I’m going to use Hangouts and I hope they’ll improve at least the functional problems mentioned above. I’m still very involved in Googles infrastructure and I still trust them with lots of my data. But my trust in their openness, doing no evil and the quality of their services is damaged and I’m unsure if they’ll ever get it back as it once was.

What do you think of this post?
  • Awesome (49)
  • Interesting (30)
  • Sucks (20)
  • Useful (14)
  • Boring (13)

My first look at Google Events

I just created an event on Google+, since I invited some people over and I wanted to try test it. First I find it visually really cool, the animated images already there look very nice and you can of course upload your own.

Google wanted to structure „Events“ in three phases. Firstly before the event in the planing stage: Date, place (with integration into calendar and maps of course), RSVP (you can invite people without Google accounts as well) and I guess discussion. It is nothing you couldn’t do via mail, but getting directions with one click and having everybody included into the discussion (nobody forgetting to answer to all recipients) is a nice bonus. All in all, the first part is of course a necessity, but done good.

The second stage is during the event. You can activate „Party mode“ on your smartphone and all your images you shoot during that time are automatically added to the event. I don’t really see the big use in this, I could just upload my photos later. Since everyone who could see the images is at the event, there is no need to look at photos in real time in my opinion… Seems useless to me, but maybe I’m missing something here.

What I liked was the third phase: Afterwards everyone can upload all of his photos to the event and all participants (and only participants in the default setting) can see them together chronologically. Thats a sooo simple but nice thing. Normally if you get photos from friends after an event, they are usually numbered differently to yours, so you would need to (hopefully automatically) rename them into some date-time thing to mix them with yours or just leave them in the separate folder. In Events you can seen them all, but you can also filter by author if you want to see only photos a specific friend made. This is something I look forward to. I just hope there will be a download feature as well, because even though I like to have a few pictures online, I always want to have a copy on my hard drive.

I still have to find out how it works for people without a Google account, but I guess they get an RSVP mail with the details and a link to RSVP. But I think thats a good enough solution.

During the streaming of the Google IO keynote yesterday I thought this is an unnecessary and dumb feature. And maybe it is unnecessary (especially for people like me, where a lot of friends don’t have Google+ accounts or don’t use them), but it is surely not done dumb. Instead Google put some thought into what might be useful and did it in an visually nice way as well. Looking forward to using it for a few occasions. (Videos and more on Googles official Events page)

What do you think of this post?
  • Interesting (7)
  • Useful (1)
  • Sucks (0)
  • Boring (0)
  • Awesome (0)

Google+ keine Chance gegen Diaspora?

Ja, eine reißerische Überschrift ich weiß. Ich will gleich auf den Punkt kommen: Nachdem ich letztens Diaspora auf meinem eigenen Server erfolgreich installieren konnte, verstärkt sich in mir das Gefühl, dass Diaspora doch langsam benutzbar wird und sehr bald zumindest technisch dazu fähig wäre, weit verbreitet genutzt zu werden. Warum sollte man Diaspora nutzen? Kurz: Deine Daten, Dein Server (oder wenigstens ein selbst gewählter.) Föderalisierte Struktur, so dass nicht alles einem Anbieter gehört und Du sogar selber für Dich und andere Anbieter sein kannst.

Aber viel wichtiger scheint mir die Frage: Warum sollte ich Google+ nutzen? Ich mag Google und G+. Aber es ist für mich persönlich wieder mehr Twitter als Facebook: Bei Twitter konnte ich auch nur vereinzelte Leute motivieren mit zu machen, bei Facebook ist jeder, seit etwa 12-18 Monaten auch ich. Und nachdem ich wegen G+ aufgehört hatte Facebook zu nutzen, hab ich zu meinem Geburtstag mal wieder reinschauen (müssen), nur um festzustellen dass all meine Freunde dort fleißig posten und selbst die, die einen G+-Account haben, 99% ihrer Aktivität dort haben. Also: Warum sollte ich G+ nutzen? Es ist ein weiteres zentrales Netz, und auch wenn ich Google im Gegensatz zu Facebook eher vertraue, ist es doch so: Sicher sein kann ich mir nicht, dass mit meinen Daten nicht irgendwann was negatives passiert. Außerdem bin ich ein wenig enttäuscht, dass G+ sich so viel Zeit mit der API zum Entwickeln externer Clients und Programme braucht. Ich denke das ist ein sehr wichtiges Feature, so dass Menschen Multi-Seiten-Clients nutzen können und alles in einer Zeitleiste sehen können. Facebook dagegen kopiert munter die wichtigsten G+ Features und meine Freunde sind auch schon dort.

Diaspora dagegen unterscheidet sich von G+ ziemlich wenig: Ähnliche Features, ähnlich leer. Aber wenigstens habe ich wirkliche Kontrolle über meine Daten. Und da frage ich mich doch: Sollte ich nicht lieber meine Aktivitäten auf Facebook und Diaspora verteilen, mit dem Versuch Leute zu Diaspora zu migrieren? Ich denke zwar, dass das genauso erfolgreich laufen wird wie meine wenig genutzten Jabber-Accounts. Auch da hoffte ich, nach jahrelanger Nutzung, dass mit Googles starker Position und dem kompatiblen Google Talk die weniger technische Gesellschaft durchdrungen werden würde und ich da mal eine vollere Kontaktliste haben würde. Die hängt aber immer noch bei ICQ, MSN und neuerdings WhatsApp rum. 🙁

Zum Abschluss noch versöhnliche Worte G+ gegenüber: Ich mag es echt. Und mein Feed ist wirklich interessant, gefüllt mit Inhalt von bekannteren Netzpersönlichkeiten und weniger bekannten Menschen, die ich einfach so gefunden habe. Nur Persönliches finde ich leider eher selten.

What do you think of this post?
  • Boring (1)
  • Interesting (1)
  • Sucks (0)
  • Useful (0)
  • Awesome (0)

Googles Rechte an Deinen Posts

Falls ihr es noch nicht gesehen habt, Ryan Estrada hat eine schöne Auflistung über Googles Rechte an von uns hochgeladenen Daten erstellt: Darin beschreibt er in eigenen Worten einfache Interpretationen der Anwaltssprache. Und auch wenn die Tatsache dass viele Rechte „irrevocable“ sind, klingt das alles sehr gut. Doch schaut selbst:

What do you think of this post?
  • Awesome (4)
  • Useful (3)
  • Interesting (1)
  • Boring (1)
  • Sucks (0)

Hat Diaspora noch eine Chance?

Diaspora machte schon 2010 Werbung mit sehr interesanten neuen Facebook-Killer-Features auf seiner Homepage. Leider ist das Projekt nach über einem Jahr Entwicklung nicht aus dem Alpha-Stadium rausgekommen. Und die Werbebotschaft ist leider auch nicht mehr aktuell oder zumindest nicht mehr wie versprochen einzigartig:

„Diaspora lässt dich deine Kontakte in Gruppen einordnen. Deine Fotos, Geschichten und Witze werden durch diese Aspekte nur mit den Menschen geteilt, für die sie gedacht sind – einzigartig bei Diaspora.“

Aber das wirklich besondere und meines Wissens nach bisher immer noch einzigartige bei Diaspora ist das dezentrale Konzept, das man schon von Jabber kennen mag: Ich kann meinen eigenen Server hosten und könnte als Diaspora-Usernamen vielleicht etwas wie der_jakob@jl42.de haben. Und andere könnten entweder auf einen eigenen Server setzen oder doch vielleicht einen, der wie der große Jabber-Server vom CCC, von einer Organisation bereit gestellt werden könnte. Kurz und gut: Man hat die Möglichkeit alleiniger Herr eigener Daten zu sein wenn man will und dennoch sich mit anderen User wie gewohnt zu vernetzen. Ohne die Internas zu kennen, müsste man da dann nur Vertrauen in seinen Serverbetreiber (also z.B. sich) und den anderen User haben. (Evtl. noch den anderen Serverbetreiber…)

Laut diesem Artikel auf t3n.de wird das gesamte Projekt von 4 Entwicklern und wenig Helfern bestritten, also kein Wunder dass es so lange dauert. Mitte Mai hatte Diaspora verkündet, dass sie schneller vorran kommen wollen („More than anything, our user feedback has been “go faster.” So go faster is what we are going to do.“), aber auch wenn ich es mir anders wünsche zweifle ich etwas daran. 🙁 Dennoch, wenn sie Anfang 2012 einen benutzbaren Beta-Betrieb anbieten könnten: Würde es noch was bringen?

Schließlich haben wir nun unsere Facebook-Alternative: Google+! Es bietet bisher immerhin bessere Möglichkeiten für die Privatsphäre und meine Bedenken der Firma gegenüber sind bisher eher klein — auf jeden Fall kleiner als gegenüber Facebook. Jedoch bin ich nicht sicher wie viele meiner Facebookfreunde auch einen G+-Account einrichten werden. Bisher sind die technisch Interessierten sofort eingestiegen (und sogar einige, die Facebook, Twitter und Co immer massiv boykottiert haben!), aber die Leute, die einfach nur mit ihren Freunden kommunizieren wollen und Farmville spielen wollen sind immer noch nur bei Facebook. Ich verstehs, es gibt einige wichtige Dinge im Leben (Versicherungen und so), da versteh ich weniger von und ich kümmer mich nur ungerne darum. So sehen das andere Leute halt mit ihren privaten Daten in sozialen Netzwerken. Aber wenn sie schon von FB nicht zu G+ wechseln, werden sie dann an etwas wie Diaspora Interesse zeigen? Und wenn ja, wollen sie dann FB, G+ und Diaspora parallel nutzen? Ich denke leider nicht. (Parallel will ich das eigentlich auch nicht.)

Ich werde Diaspora natürlich mit einem eigenen Server sofort ausprobieren wenn eine Version im Beta-Stadium erscheint. Ich denke nur dass meine Freundesliste dort wie schon mein Jabber-Account immer ziemlich leer und geekig sein wird. Naja, wenigstens mein GTalk-Account (auch XMPP/Jabber als Protokoll) füllt sich nun dank G+ langsam. 🙂

Google+

What do you think of this post?
  • Interesting (1)
  • Sucks (0)
  • Boring (0)
  • Useful (0)
  • Awesome (0)

Kurze Links zum Google+ Profil

Momentan ist mein Google+ Profil für Google unter der „schönen“ Adresse https://plus.google.com/105897125990837928206 zu erreichen. Auch wenn ich bald anfangen muss mir IPv6-Adressen zu merken, ist das eher schwer für mich und vorallem für andere, die mich da vielleicht erreichen wollen/sollen. Im Netz hab ich bisher zwei Ideen zu dem Thema gefunden. Besonders gut gefällt mir eisys Idee einfach seine eigene Blog-Adresse dafür zu nutzen. Deshalb zeigt nun http://blog.jl42.de/+ auf mein G+Profil. Die zweite Lösung ist eine Verlinkung über gplus.to, wo man sich einen Kurznamen geben lassen kann: Auch gplus.to/jakob verlinkt auf mein Profil. Aber mit der ersten Lösung hat man angenehm viel Kontrolle über den Link und das Ziel, so dass mir das besser gefällt. Außerdem bekommt derjenige dann auch gleich die Adresse meines Blogs mit.

What do you think of this post?
  • Interesting (3)
  • Useful (2)
  • Sucks (0)
  • Boring (0)
  • Awesome (0)

Google+

Da ich letzte Woche ein wenig Ablenkung brauchte, freute ich mich dass Google sein neues soziales Netzwerk, Google+, veröffentlicht hat. Nachdem ich einem Tag Twitter über Google-Realtime überwacht habe, hab ich auch einen Einladung bekommen. 🙂 Zwei Dinge gefallen mir an Google+ besonders. Der eine Vorteil wird von dem folgenden xkcd-Comic super beschrieben:

Klar, eigentlich haben wir schon Facebook. Und so ziemlich jeder, der ein soziales Netzwerk nutzen möchte, ist auch da. Das ist schließlich das wichtigste an einem sozialem Netzwerk: Das die Leute mit denen Du interagieren willst dabei sind. Aber Facebook hat ein Problem: Es gehört Facebook. Und Facebook stellt sich meiner Ansicht nach ziemlich dumm und arrogant an. Jedes neue Feature wird ohne Warnung aktiviert, egal ob es möglicherweise in Deine Privatsphäre einschneidet oder nicht. Das letzte Beispiel ist die Gesichtserkennung, von der ich auch nur woanders im Netz erfahren habe und sie dann deaktivieren musste. Google hatte auch sein Privacy-Fiasko mit Buzz, aber sie scheinen daraus gelernt zu haben und haben bei mir generell einen guten Ruf was Daten angeht. Der Umgang mit Instant Upload im Android-Client ist ein gutes Beispiel dafür: Es ist ein cooles Feature, das alle Bilder die man mit dem Handy machst direkt im Hintergrund in ein nur von dem User selbst zugreifbares Album hochlädt. Vorteil ist, man kann dann ohne lange Wartezeiten schnell Bilder mit anderen teilen. Natürlich ist es auch potentiell sehr gefährlich für die eigenen Daten. Aber diesmal fragt Googles Client beim ersten Start ob man das Feature aktivieren will und aktiviert es nicht einfach stillschweigend. Google betreibt sogar eine eigene Webseite, die sich mit dem Thema beschäftigt, Daten von Google zu exportieren. (Google+ hat auch schon eingebaute Möglichkeiten eigene Daten zu exportieren.) Alles in allem sehr viel Vorbildlicher als Facebook in den letzten Jahren.

Google+ hat ein paar super Konzepte, z.B. Circles mit denen man sehr einfach jeden Beitrag den man veröffentlicht einem anderen Benutzerkreis zur Verfügung stellen kann. Aber auf die ganzen Vorteile kann Google selber oder andere Seiten besser eingehen als ich. Überall liest man, dass Google+ ein Facebook-Konkurrent ist. Und das ist es natürlich auch. Für mich sehe ich in den flexibleren Rechten wieder eine Möglichkeit einen Dienst wie Twitter zu nutzten. Denn dank der Circles kann ich bei jedem Post wählen, ob ich ihn für Freunde, Bekannte, Arbeitskollegen oder aber die ganze Welt lesbar mache. Facebook war für mich immer geschlossen, meine paar Dutzent Freunde konnten meine Beiträge lesen und das wars. Wenn ich hier einen interessanten Link finde, teile ich ihn mit allen, die sich dafür interessieren was ich so zu teilen habe. Meine privaten Infos (die auch eher nur Freunde/Familie/etc. interessieren) teile ich dann wieder etwas privater. Umgekehrt kann ich hier also auch wie bei Twitter Leuten folgen, die mich gar nicht kennen und wahrscheinlich auch nicht kennen wollen. Da würden mich die Kinobesuche oder Familienfeiern nicht mal interessieren, aber der Link zu einer neuen Android-App jedoch schon.

Ich hätte es lieber gesehen, wenn ein dezentraler Dienst wie Diaspora Facebook abgelöst hätte, aber ich bevorzuge Google über Facebook allemal. Und ich bin super gespannt, wie sich die ganze Sache entwickeln wird.

Und außerdem hat mich Google dazu gebracht mal wieder zu bloggen, mal schauen ob das anhält. 🙂

What do you think of this post?
  • Interesting (5)
  • Sucks (0)
  • Boring (0)
  • Useful (0)
  • Awesome (0)

Google Maps Navigation nun auch in Deutschland

Seit heute ist es möglich ein Android Mobiltelefon mit Google Maps als Navigationssystem mit „Turn-by-Turn-Navigation“ und Sprachausgabe zu benutzen. In den USA gibt es das Feature nun schon einige Monate, nun dürfen wir in Deutschland auch. Ich habe die Funktion eben auf dem Rückweg von der Arbeit getestet und muss sagen, dass es ziemlich gut aussieht für eine Beta-Version. Ich hatte mir zwar für rund 30€ CoPilot Live 8 gekauft, was auch immer gut funktioniert hat, aber Google präsentiert sich als leichtere und schnellere Alternative für mich. Hätte es Googles Lösung vor einem Jahr schon gegeben, hätte ich sicherlich kein Geld für CoPilot ausgegeben, da ich es auch selten nutze. Bei meinem 15km Test eben wäre Google zwar eine andere Strecke als ich gefahren, aber das machen die anderen Navigationssysteme, die ich bisher gesehen habe auch. Ansonsten war die deutsche Sprachausgabe gut verständlich, auch wenn ich mit der Zeit auf eine natürlichere Stimme hoffe. Da es kostenlos ist, möchte ich nicht zu viel drüber schreiben, es kann sich schließlich jeder selbst ein Bild davon machen. Und wer kein Android Mobiltelefon hat, kann sich das durchaus beeindruckende Video mit den Funktionen aus den USA anschauen, wie z.B. Verkehrsdichte:

Mehr Infos und Bilder auf Googles Seite zur Google Maps Navigation.

What do you think of this post?
  • Interesting (5)
  • Boring (2)
  • Sucks (1)
  • Useful (1)
  • Awesome (1)